“Homework” for this week: Check out ‘Shout Out!’

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In lieu of your weekly blog post for this week, please check out ShoutOut! JMU, a student-run feminist blog collective at James Madison University in Virginia. These students are undergraduates from a variety of different departments on their campus. Go to the blog (click the image!), peruse the posts, and thoughtfully comment on at least one. They can also be found on Facebook and Twitter if you’d like to keep in touch 😀

We can talk more in person next week about what you think of the blog collective. I would love to have something similar at SIUC!

SuperPost for week 10: March 27th

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PLEASE NOTE:  Your individual blog posts (on your own blogs) are due every week at the normal time even though we won’t be meeting online. If you happen to read this over the weekend and forgot to blog, please just do so by Tuesday.

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Theme for the week: Women in STEM (Science/Technology/Engineering/Math)

Readings to discuss in class Tuesday: 

 


Guidelines for Short Paper #1

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Don't be this guy

Don't be this guy

WMST 491 Special Topics: Women, Gender & Sexuality on the Web — Guidelines for Short Paper #1

Now that we have completed the first half of the semester, covering a range of subtopics surrounding identity formation/maintenance on the Internet, I ask you all to write a brief paper communicating your grasp on the issue. I expect you to make reference to the articles and media we have discussed in order to synthesize our conversations and the arguments put forth.

While your weekly blog posts are allowed – and encouraged – to be informal and conversational, I expect your style for this paper to be more formal and suited to academic writing in order to display your ability to communicate for different audiences. Because of this, you are required to cite sources consistently using whatever format (MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.) you are most familiar with.

Papers must be between 2-3 pages (a bit longer is okay, but no fewer than two full pages), double-spaced, 1-inch margins, standard size 12 font. Comic sans will make me vomit.

A hard copy of your paper is due Tues, March 20th when we return from break. If you would like to email me a copy in addition to the printed version, that is fine.

If you have any questions during break, please get ahold of me in whatever way you prefer.

SuperPost for week 7: Feb 28st and Mar 1st

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Theme for the week: Trans* YouTube Experiences

Readings to discuss in class on Tuesday: 

Additional material to discuss on Thursday: 

(WARNING: POTENTIALLY NSFW)

THE VIDEO RESPONSE!

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Additional: SOFFA Support (significant others, family, friends, and allies of the trans* community): http://soffasupport.tumblr.com/

THURSDAY Feb 23rd

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(Making a separate post so the conversation can be less confusing)

Additional material to discuss ONLINE on Thursday: 

Fat is (Still) a Feminist Issue: (WARNING: POTENTIALLY NSFW)

(if you’re interested in MORE, here’s a giant round-up of body-positive/fat-positive blogs: http://glitter-pits.tumblr.com/post/7274662211/big-ol-bodyposi-tumblr-roundup)
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Also: Sam sent me this link and I think it’s pretty great, if you’d like to skim: http://yrwelcome.wordpress.com/2011/02/01/why-im-fat-positive/
A snippet from her list of “Why I’m Fat Positive,” specifically looking at intersections of class, race, and size:
I’m fat positive because I work at being an anti-racist ally, and fatphobia reifies systems of power that erase the bodies of many people of color, and that stereotype, parody and ultimately nullify their experiences. For example, in order to function as an anti-welfare trope, the welfare queen must be a woman (in this case, a single woman), a single parent (careless and promiscuous), poor (irresponsible), fat (slovenly) and Black (the Other, for middle class white voters). The welfare queen stereotype relies on some level on the fatness of the subject in order to function. And, on top of that, it’s predicated on a fear of someone “taking too much,” crossing boundaries and claiming resources that aren’t hers to take, an almost predatory image of a fat woman of color. This theme of “taking what’s not yours” is repeated with communities of color when it comes to welfare, English-only ballot measures, immigrant rights, and more. And, of course, it plays a core role in fatphobia: fat people eat too much, take up too much space, and generally exist to consume.

SuperPost for week 6: Feb 21st and 23rd

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Theme for the week: Body Image and Body-Positive Communities

Readings to discuss ONLINE Tuesday: 

Body-Positivity (WARNING: POTENTIALLY NSFW)

Additional material to discuss IN CLASS on Thursday: 

Fat is (Still) a Feminist Issue: (WARNING: POTENTIALLY NSFW)

(if you’re interested in MORE, here’s a giant round-up of body-positive/fat-positive blogs: http://glitter-pits.tumblr.com/post/7274662211/big-ol-bodyposi-tumblr-roundup)

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SuperPost for week 5: Feb 14th and 16th

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Theme for the week: Race and Ethnic Identity in the Digital

"privilege denying dude" meme

Readings to discuss in class on Tuesday: 

Additional material to discuss on Thursday: 

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Optional: Byrne, Dara N. “The Future of (the) ’Race’: Identity, Discourse, and the Rise of Computer-mediated Public Spheres.” Learning Race and Ethnicity: Youth and Digital Media. Edited by Anna Everett. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008. 15–38. http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/dmal.9780262550673.015 [PDF Link]

SuperPost for week 4: Feb 7th and 9th

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Theme for the week:   Sexuality and coming out online

Readings to discuss in class on Tuesday: 

Additional material to discuss on Thursday: 

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SuperPost for week 3: Jan 31st and Feb 2nd

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Theme for the week:   “Virtual Girls”: Youth and identity online

Readings to discuss in class on Tuesday: 

Additional material to discuss on Thursday: 

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