Category Archives: Uncategorized

Pornography Presentation

Standard

Here is the link to my presentation…sorry so late, but do enjoy!!!

-Kiara Ann

WMST491_Porn_Presentation

Advertisements

“Homework” for this week: Check out ‘Shout Out!’

Standard

In lieu of your weekly blog post for this week, please check out ShoutOut! JMU, a student-run feminist blog collective at James Madison University in Virginia. These students are undergraduates from a variety of different departments on their campus. Go to the blog (click the image!), peruse the posts, and thoughtfully comment on at least one. They can also be found on Facebook and Twitter if you’d like to keep in touch 😀

We can talk more in person next week about what you think of the blog collective. I would love to have something similar at SIUC!

THURSDAY Feb 23rd

Standard

(Making a separate post so the conversation can be less confusing)

Additional material to discuss ONLINE on Thursday: 

Fat is (Still) a Feminist Issue: (WARNING: POTENTIALLY NSFW)

(if you’re interested in MORE, here’s a giant round-up of body-positive/fat-positive blogs: http://glitter-pits.tumblr.com/post/7274662211/big-ol-bodyposi-tumblr-roundup)
—-
Also: Sam sent me this link and I think it’s pretty great, if you’d like to skim: http://yrwelcome.wordpress.com/2011/02/01/why-im-fat-positive/
A snippet from her list of “Why I’m Fat Positive,” specifically looking at intersections of class, race, and size:
I’m fat positive because I work at being an anti-racist ally, and fatphobia reifies systems of power that erase the bodies of many people of color, and that stereotype, parody and ultimately nullify their experiences. For example, in order to function as an anti-welfare trope, the welfare queen must be a woman (in this case, a single woman), a single parent (careless and promiscuous), poor (irresponsible), fat (slovenly) and Black (the Other, for middle class white voters). The welfare queen stereotype relies on some level on the fatness of the subject in order to function. And, on top of that, it’s predicated on a fear of someone “taking too much,” crossing boundaries and claiming resources that aren’t hers to take, an almost predatory image of a fat woman of color. This theme of “taking what’s not yours” is repeated with communities of color when it comes to welfare, English-only ballot measures, immigrant rights, and more. And, of course, it plays a core role in fatphobia: fat people eat too much, take up too much space, and generally exist to consume.